Using a New Literacy

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Now that we have finished today’s session on new literacies, let’s take what we have learned and apply it by answering the following question:

What impact would collaborative learning experiences using new literacies have on students compared to a teacher-driven process?

Post your reply in the comments below. Feel free to reply to a comment made by another colleague.  Happy blogging!

12 thoughts on “Using a New Literacy

    acoecorelearning responded:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:33 pm

    When students are in charge of choosing their own modality for learning they are much more invested in the learning process. People in general derive more meaning from things that have a direct connection to them

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    Anonymous said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:34 pm

    Create excitement re learning on the parts of students
    Conceptualize learning experinces
    Challenge for teachers to “bring it all together” and ensure addressing standards
    Recreate “teachable moments” by “planing a skeleton” on a field trip/walk, etc.

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    Cheryl Wozniak said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:34 pm

    More options for how to approach learning would be generated. Students would not only learn the content but also would learn more about how to engage in the process of learning.

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    Anonymous said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:34 pm

    Student’s will have higher engagement and ownership of their learning! It will be meaningful and applicable.

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    sonal said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:34 pm

    Setting students up to bear more of the cognitive load is the key. These new literacies don’t require teachers to “gate keep” knowledge nor process, instead it’s an open road.

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    Anonymous said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:34 pm

    Collaborative learning experiences help students, through collaboration, persevere and problem solve as an active part of their learning. It changes learning from spoon-fed to an actionable exercise. This also allows for built-in differentiation, in that students can attack a problem or project that is at their ability level.

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    Anonymous said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:35 pm

    Students would feel that they have more ownership. Students could introduce new communication tools to the teacher. The teacher-driven process may be viewed by the students as the “old way” to communicate.

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    Anonymous said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:36 pm

    The student impact on being able to using new literacies provides an opportunity for numerous, diverse ideas that students are now exposed to, as opposed to one other viewpoint, the teacher’s. It also allows for students to experience new/different processes that they may want to use moving forward. The point is to expand their thinking and support them in being open to wanting to know about the bigger world around them.

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    Anonymous said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:36 pm

    The new literacies provide opportunities for what Carol Tomlinson advocates for in the context of differentiated processes and products. We know this improves engagement and achievement and we need to bring our teachers along

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    Anonymous said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:37 pm

    New literacies have the capacity to provide students access through the tools/modes through which they are most comfortable rather than those most familiar to the teacher. By allowing access to blogging, fan fiction, memes, vlogs, animation, social networking, etc… students are interacting through their familiar channels. Further, these channels will generally be far superior to ‘traditional’ literacies in terms of their abilities to facilitate collaboration, access reference materials, and serve multiple learning styles.

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    Scott Pizani said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:38 pm

    Prior to beginning to discuss the impact upon students, it may be important to engage in a discussion focused upon the fundamental shift in the role of the teacher from “sage on the stage” to facilitator of student learning. What professional development / support would teachers need in order to make this fundamental shift in their role and to deepen their understanding of the connection between new literacy and instructional practices / pedagogy?

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    Anonymous said:
    December 19, 2014 at 5:39 pm

    Using these strategies is likely to increase student engagement far beyond the results derived from the teacher-led methods. Students will start to see the “real-world” connections and applications, and students will benefit by exposure to multiple methodologies for solutions.

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